Custom Workflows

Custom workflows can be defined to override the default commands that Atlantis runs.

Usage

Custom workflows can be specified in the Server-Side Repo Config or in the Repo-Level atlantis.yaml files.

Notes

  • If you want to allow repos to select their own workflows, they must have the allowed_overrides: [workflow] setting. See server-side repo config use cases for more details.
  • If in addition you also want to allow repos to define their own workflows, they must have the allow_custom_workflows: true setting. See server-side repo config use cases for more details.

Use Cases

.tfvars files

Given the structure:

.
└── project1
    ├── main.tf
    ├── production.tfvars
    └── staging.tfvars

If you wanted Atlantis to automatically run plan with -var-file staging.tfvars and -var-file production.tfvars you could define two workflows:

# repos.yaml or atlantis.yaml
workflows:
  staging:
    plan:
      steps:
      - init
      - plan:
          extra_args: ["-var-file", "staging.tfvars"]
    # NOTE: no need to define the apply stage because it will default
    # to the normal apply stage.
    
  production:
    plan:
      steps:
      - init
      - plan:
          extra_args: ["-var-file", "production.tfvars"]
    apply:
      steps:
        - apply:
            extra_args: ["-var-file", "production.tfvars"]
    import:
      steps:
        - init
        - import:
            extra_args: ["-var-file", "production.tfvars"]
    state_rm:
      steps:
        - init
        - state_rm:
            extra_args: ["-lock=false"]

Then in your repo-level atlantis.yaml file, you would reference the workflows:

# atlantis.yaml
version: 3
projects:
# If two or more projects have the same dir and workspace, they must also have
# a 'name' key to differentiate them.
- name: project1-staging
  dir: project1
  workflow: staging
- name: project1-production
  dir: project1
  workflow: production

workflows:
  # If you didn't define the workflows in your server-side repos.yaml config,
  # you would define them here instead.

When you want to apply the plans, you can comment

atlantis apply -p project1-staging

and

atlantis apply -p project1-production

Where -p refers to the project name.

Adding extra arguments to Terraform commands

If you need to append flags to terraform plan or apply temporarily, you can append flags on a comment following --, for example commenting:

atlantis plan -- -lock=false

If you always need to do this for a project's init, plan or apply commands then you must define a custom workflow and set the extra_args key for the command you need to modify.

# atlantis.yaml or repos.yaml
workflows:
  myworkflow:
    plan:
      steps:
      - init:
          extra_args: ["-lock=false"]
      - plan:
          extra_args: ["-lock=false"]
    apply:
      steps:
      - apply:
          extra_args: ["-lock=false"]

If policy checking is enabled, extra_args can also be used to change the default behaviour of conftest.

workflows:
  myworkflow:
    policy_check:
      steps:
      - show
      - policy_check:
          extra_args: ["--all-namespaces"]

Custom init/plan/apply Commands

If you want to customize terraform init, plan or apply in ways that aren't supported by extra_args, you can completely override those commands.

In this example, we're not using any of the built-in commands and are instead using our own.

# atlantis.yaml or repos.yaml
workflows:
  myworkflow:
    plan:
      steps:
      # If you want to hide command output from Atlantis's PR comment, use
      # the output option on the run step's expanded form.
      - run:
          command: terraform init -input=false
          output: hide
      
      # If you're using workspaces you need to select the workspace using the
      # $WORKSPACE environment variable.
      - run: terraform workspace select $WORKSPACE
      
      # You MUST output the plan using -out $PLANFILE because Atlantis expects
      # plans to be in a specific location.
      - run: terraform plan -input=false -refresh -out $PLANFILE
    apply:
      steps:
      # Again, you must use the $PLANFILE environment variable.
      - run: terraform apply $PLANFILE

CDKTF

Here are the requirements to enable CDKTFopen in new window

  • A custom image with CDKTF installed
  • Add **/cdk.tf.json to the list of Atlantis autoplan files.
  • Set the atlantis-include-git-untracked-files flag so that the Terraform files dynamically generated by CDKTF will be add to the Atlantis modified file list.
  • Use pre_workflow_hooks to run cdktf synth
  • Optional: There isn't a requirement to use a repo atlantis.yaml but one can be leveraged if needed.

Custom Image

# Dockerfile
FROM ghcr.io/runatlantis/atlantis:v0.19.7

USER root
RUN apk add npm && npm i -g cdktf-cli

Server Config

# env variables
ATLANTIS_AUTOPLAN_FILE_LIST="**/*.tf,**/*.tfvars,**/*.tfvars.json,**/cdk.tf.json"
ATLANTIS_INCLUDE_GIT_UNTRACKED_FILES=true

OR

atlantis server --config config.yaml

# config.yaml
autoplan-file-list: "**/*.tf,**/*.tfvars,**/*.tfvars.json,**/cdk.tf.json"
include-git-untracked-files: true

Server Repo Config

Use pre_workflow_hooks

atlantis server --repo-config="repos.yaml"

# repos.yaml
repos:
  - id: /.*cdktf.*/
    pre_workflow_hooks:
      - run: npm i && cdktf get && cdktf synth --output ci-cdktf.out

Note: don't use the default cdktf.out directory that CDKTF uses, as this should be in the .gitignore list of the repo, so that locally generated files are not checked in.

Repo Structure

This is the git repo structure after running cdktf synth. The cdk.tf.json files contain the Terraform configuration that atlantis can run.

$ tree --gitignore
.
├── cdktf.json
├── ci-cdktf.out
│   ├── manifest.json
│   └── stacks
│       └── eks
│           └── cdk.tf.json

Workflow

  1. Container orchestrator (k8s/fargate/ecs/etc) uses the custom docker image of atlantis with cdktf installed with the --autoplan-file-list to trigger on cdk.tf.json files and --include-git-untracked-files set to include the CDKTF dynamically generated Terraform files in the Atlantis plan.
  2. PR branch is pushed up containing cdktf code changes.
  3. Atlantis checks out the branch in the repo.
  4. Atlantis runs the npm i && cdktf get && cdktf synth command in the repo root as a step in pre_workflow_hooks, generating the cdk.tf.json Terraform files.
  5. Atlantis detects the cdk.tf.json untracked files in a number of directories.
  6. Atlantis then runs terraform workflows in the respective directories as usual.

Terragrunt

Atlantis supports running custom commands in place of the default Atlantis commands. We can use this functionality to enable Terragruntopen in new window.

You can either use your repo's atlantis.yaml file or the Atlantis server's repos.yaml file.

Given a directory structure:

.
└── live
    ├── prod
    │   └── terragrunt.hcl
    └── staging
        └── terragrunt.hcl

If using the server repos.yaml file, you would use the following config:

# repos.yaml
# Specify TERRAGRUNT_TFPATH environment variable to accommodate setting --default-tf-version
# Generate json plan via terragrunt for policy checks
repos:
- id: "/.*/"
  workflow: terragrunt
workflows:
  terragrunt:
    plan:
      steps:
      - env:
          name: TERRAGRUNT_TFPATH
          command: 'echo "terraform${ATLANTIS_TERRAFORM_VERSION}"'
      - env:
          # Reduce Terraform suggestion output
          name: TF_IN_AUTOMATION
          value: 'true'
      - run:
          # Allow for targetted plans/applies as not supported for Terraform wrappers by default
          command: terragrunt plan -input=false $(printf '%s' $COMMENT_ARGS | sed 's/,/ /g' | tr -d '\\') -no-color -out $PLANFILE
          output: hide
      - run: |
          terragrunt show $PLANFILE
    apply:
      steps:
      - env:
          name: TERRAGRUNT_TFPATH
          command: 'echo "terraform${ATLANTIS_TERRAFORM_VERSION}"'
      - env:
          # Reduce Terraform suggestion output
          name: TF_IN_AUTOMATION
          value: 'true'
      - run: terragrunt apply -input=false $PLANFILE
    import:
      steps:
      - env:
          name: TERRAGRUNT_TFPATH
          command: 'echo "terraform${DEFAULT_TERRAFORM_VERSION}"'
      - env:
          name: TF_VAR_author
          command: 'git show -s --format="%ae" $HEAD_COMMIT'
      # Allow for imports as not supported for Terraform wrappers by default
      - run: terragrunt import -input=false $(printf '%s' $COMMENT_ARGS | sed 's/,/ /' | tr -d '\\')
    state_rm:
      steps:
      - env:
          name: TERRAGRUNT_TFPATH
          command: 'echo "terraform${DEFAULT_TERRAFORM_VERSION}"'
      # Allow for state removals as not supported for Terraform wrappers by default
      - run: terragrunt state rm $(printf '%s' $COMMENT_ARGS | sed 's/,/ /' | tr -d '\\')

If using the repo's atlantis.yaml file you would use the following config:

version: 3
projects:
- dir: live/staging
  workflow: terragrunt
- dir: live/prod
  workflow: terragrunt
workflows:
  terragrunt:
    plan:
      steps:
      - env:
          name: TERRAGRUNT_TFPATH
          command: 'echo "terraform${ATLANTIS_TERRAFORM_VERSION}"'
      - env:
          # Reduce Terraform suggestion output
          name: TF_IN_AUTOMATION
          value: 'true'
      - run:
          command: terragrunt plan -input=false -out=$PLANFILE
          output: strip_refreshing
    apply:
      steps:
      - env:
          name: TERRAGRUNT_TFPATH
          command: 'echo "terraform${ATLANTIS_TERRAFORM_VERSION}"'
      - env:
          # Reduce Terraform suggestion output
          name: TF_IN_AUTOMATION
          value: 'true'
      - run: terragrunt apply $PLANFILE

NOTE: If using the repo's atlantis.yaml file, you will need to specify each directory that is a Terragrunt project.

WARNING

Atlantis will need to have the terragrunt binary in its PATH. If you're using Docker you can build your own image, see Customization.

If you don't want to create/manage the repo's atlantis.yaml file yourself, you can use the tool terragrunt-atlantis-configopen in new window to generate it.

The terragrunt-atlantis-config tool is a community project and not maintained by the Atlantis team.

Running custom commands

Atlantis supports running completely custom commands. In this example, we want to run a script after every apply:

# repos.yaml or atlantis.yaml
workflows:
  myworkflow:
    apply:
      steps:
      - apply
      - run: ./my-custom-script.sh

Notes

  • We don't need to write a plan key under myworkflow. If plan isn't set, Atlantis will use the default plan workflow which is what we want in this case.
  • A custom command will only terminate if all output file descriptors are closed. Therefore a custom command can only be sent to the background (e.g. for an SSH tunnel during the terraform run) when its output is redirected to a different location. For example, Atlantis will execute a custom script containing the following code to create a SSH tunnel correctly: ssh -f -M -S /tmp/ssh_tunnel -L 3306:database:3306 -N bastion 1>/dev/null 2>&1. Without the redirect, the script would block the Atlantis workflow.

Custom Backend Config

If you need to specify the -backend-config flag to terraform init you'll need to use a custom workflow. In this example, we're using custom backend files to configure two remote states, one for each environment. We're then using .tfvars files to load different variables for each environment.

# repos.yaml or atlantis.yaml
workflows:
  staging:
    plan:
      steps:
      - run: rm -rf .terraform
      - init:
          extra_args: [-backend-config=staging.backend.tfvars]
      - plan:
          extra_args: [-var-file=staging.tfvars]
  production:
    plan:
      steps:
      - run: rm -rf .terraform
      - init:
          extra_args: [-backend-config=production.backend.tfvars]
      - plan:
          extra_args: [-var-file=production.tfvars]

NOTE

We have to use a custom run step to rm -rf .terraform because otherwise Terraform will complain in-between commands since the backend config has changed.

You would then reference the workflows in your repo-level atlantis.yaml:

version: 3
projects:
- name: staging
  dir: .
  workflow: staging
- name: production
  dir: .
  workflow: production

Reference

Workflow

plan:
apply:
import:
state_rm:
KeyTypeDefaultRequiredDescription
planStagesteps: [init, plan]noHow to plan for this project.
applyStagesteps: [apply]noHow to apply for this project.
importStagesteps: [init, import]noHow to import for this project.
state_rmStagesteps: [init, state_rm]noHow to run state rm for this project.

Stage

steps:
- run: custom-command
- init
- plan:
    extra_args: [-lock=false]
KeyTypeDefaultRequiredDescription
stepsarray[Step][]noList of steps for this stage. If the steps key is empty, no steps will be run for this stage.

Step

Built-In Commands

Steps can be a single string for a built-in command.

- init
- plan
- apply
- import
- state_rm
KeyTypeDefaultRequiredDescription
init/plan/apply/import/state_rmstringnonenoUse a built-in command without additional configuration. Only init, plan, apply, import and state_rm are supported

Built-In Command With Extra Args

A map from string to extra_args for a built-in command with extra arguments.

- init:
    extra_args: [arg1, arg2]
- plan:
    extra_args: [arg1, arg2]
- apply:
    extra_args: [arg1, arg2]
- import:
    extra_args: [arg1, arg2]
- state_rm:
    extra_args: [arg1, arg2]
KeyTypeDefaultRequiredDescription
init/plan/apply/import/state_rmmap[extra_args -> array[string]]nonenoUse a built-in command and append extra_args. Only init, plan, apply, import and state_rm are supported as keys and only extra_args is supported as a value

Custom run Command

A custom command can be written in 2 ways

Compact:

- run: custom-command arg1 arg2
KeyTypeDefaultRequiredDescription
runstringnonenoRun a custom command

Full

- run: 
    command: custom-command arg1 arg2
    output: show
KeyTypeDefaultRequiredDescription
runmap[string -> string]nonenoRun a custom command
run.commandstringnoneyesShell command to run
run.outputstring"show"noHow to post-process the output of this command when posted in the PR comment. The options are
* show - preserve the full output
* hide - hide output from comment (still visible in the real-time streaming output)
* strip_refreshing - hide all output up until and including the last line containing "Refreshing...". This matches the behavior of the built-in plan command

Notes

  • run steps in the main workflow are executed with the following environment variables:
    note: these variables are not available to pre or post workflows
    • WORKSPACE - The Terraform workspace used for this project, ex. default.
      NOTE: if the step is executed before init then Atlantis won't have switched to this workspace yet.
    • ATLANTIS_TERRAFORM_VERSION - The version of Terraform used for this project, ex. 0.11.0.
    • DIR - Absolute path to the current directory.
    • PLANFILE - Absolute path to the location where Atlantis expects the plan to either be generated (by plan) or already exist (if running apply). Can be used to override the built-in plan/apply commands, ex. run: terraform plan -out $PLANFILE.
    • SHOWFILE - Absolute path to the location where Atlantis expects the plan in json format to either be generated (by show) or already exist (if running policy checks). Can be used to override the built-in plan/apply commands, ex. run: terraform show -json $PLANFILE > $SHOWFILE.
    • POLICYCHECKFILE - Absolute path to the location of policy check output if Atlantis runs policy checks. See policy checking for information of data structure.
    • BASE_REPO_NAME - Name of the repository that the pull request will be merged into, ex. atlantis.
    • BASE_REPO_OWNER - Owner of the repository that the pull request will be merged into, ex. runatlantis.
    • HEAD_REPO_NAME - Name of the repository that is getting merged into the base repository, ex. atlantis.
    • HEAD_REPO_OWNER - Owner of the repository that is getting merged into the base repository, ex. acme-corp.
    • HEAD_BRANCH_NAME - Name of the head branch of the pull request (the branch that is getting merged into the base)
    • HEAD_COMMIT - The sha256 that points to the head of the branch that is being pull requested into the base. If the pull request is from Bitbucket Cloud the string will only be 12 characters long because Bitbucket Cloud truncates its commit IDs.
    • BASE_BRANCH_NAME - Name of the base branch of the pull request (the branch that the pull request is getting merged into)
    • PROJECT_NAME - Name of the project configured in atlantis.yaml. If no project name is configured this will be an empty string.
    • PULL_NUM - Pull request number or ID, ex. 2.
    • PULL_URL - Pull request URL, ex. https://github.com/runatlantis/atlantis/pull/2.
    • PULL_AUTHOR - Username of the pull request author, ex. acme-user.
    • REPO_REL_DIR - The relative path of the project in the repository. For example if your project is in dir1/dir2/ then this will be set to "dir1/dir2". If your project is at the root this will be ".".
    • USER_NAME - Username of the VCS user running command, ex. acme-user. During an autoplan, the user will be the Atlantis API user, ex. atlantis.
    • COMMENT_ARGS - Any additional flags passed in the comment on the pull request. Flags are separated by commas and every character is escaped, ex. atlantis plan -- arg1 arg2 will result in COMMENT_ARGS=\a\r\g\1,\a\r\g\2.
  • A custom command will only terminate if all output file descriptors are closed. Therefore a custom command can only be sent to the background (e.g. for an SSH tunnel during the terraform run) when its output is redirected to a different location. For example, Atlantis will execute a custom script containing the following code to create a SSH tunnel correctly: ssh -f -M -S /tmp/ssh_tunnel -L 3306:database:3306 -N bastion 1>/dev/null 2>&1. Without the redirect, the script would block the Atlantis workflow.
  • If a workflow step returns a non-zero exit code, the workflow will stop.

Environment Variable env Command

The env command allows you to set environment variables that will be available to all steps defined below the env step.

You can set hard coded values via the value key, or set dynamic values via the command key which allows you to run any command and uses the output as the environment variable value.

- env:
    name: ENV_NAME
    value: hard-coded-value
- env:
    name: ENV_NAME_2
    command: 'echo "dynamic-value-$(date)"'
KeyTypeDefaultRequiredDescription
envmap[string -> string]nonenoSet environment variables for subsequent steps
env.namestringnoneyesName of the environment variable
env.valuestringnonenoSet the value of the environment variable to a hard-coded string. Cannot be set at the same time as command
env.commandstringnonenoSet the value of the environment variable to the output of a command. Cannot be set at the same time as value

Notes

  • env command's can use any of the built-in environment variables available to run commands.

Multiple Environment Variables multienv Command

The multienv command allows you to set dynamic number of multiple environment variables that will be available to all steps defined below the multienv step.

- multienv: custom-command
KeyTypeDefaultRequiredDescription
multienvstringnonenoRun a custom command and add set environment variables according to the result

The result of the executed command must have a fixed format: EnvVar1Name=value1,EnvVar2Name=value2,EnvVar3Name=value3

The name-value pairs in the result are added as environment variables if success is true otherwise the workflow execution stops with error and the errorMessage is getting displayed.

Notes

  • multienv command's can use any of the built-in environment variables available to run commands.
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