Getting Started

These instructions are for running Atlantis locally on your own computer so you can test it out against your own repositories before deciding whether to install it more permanently.

TIP

If you want to set up a production-ready Atlantis installation, read Deployment.

Steps:

Install Terraform

terraform needs to be in the $PATH for Atlantis. Download from https://www.terraform.io/downloads.html

unzip path/to/terraform_*.zip -d /usr/local/bin

Download Atlantis

Get the latest release from https://github.com/runatlantis/atlantis/releases and unpackage it.

Download Ngrok

Atlantis needs to be accessible somewhere that github.com/gitlab.com/bitbucket.org or your GitHub/GitLab Enterprise installation can reach. One way to accomplish this is with ngrok, a tool that forwards your local port to a random public hostname.

Go to https://ngrok.com/download, download ngrok and unzip it.

Start ngrok on port 4141 and take note of the hostname it gives you:

./ngrok http 4141

In a new tab (where you'll soon start Atlantis) create an environment variable with ngrok's hostname:

URL="https://{YOUR_HOSTNAME}.ngrok.io"

Create a Webhook Secret

GitHub and GitLab use webhook secrets so clients can verify that the webhooks came from them.

WARNING

Bitbucket Cloud (bitbucket.org) doesn't use webhook secrets so if you're using Bitbucket Cloud you can skip this step. When you're ready to do a production deploy of Atlantis you should whitelist Bitbucket IPs to ensure the webhooks are coming from them.

Create a random string of any length (you can use http://www.unit-conversion.info/texttools/random-string-generator/) and set an environment variable:

SECRET="{YOUR_RANDOM_STRING}"

Add Webhook

Take the URL that ngrok output and create a webhook in your GitHub, GitLab or Bitbucket repo:

GitHub or GitHub Enterprise Webhook

Expand
  • Go to your repo's settings
  • Select Webhooks or Hooks in the sidebar
  • Click Add webhook
  • set Payload URL to your ngrok url with /events at the end. Ex. https://c5004d84.ngrok.io/events
  • double-check you added /events to the end of your URL.
  • set Content type to application/json
  • set Secret to your random string
  • select Let me select individual events
  • check the boxes
    • Pull request reviews
    • Pushes
    • Issue comments
    • Pull requests
  • leave Active checked
  • click Add webhook

GitLab or GitLab Enterprise Webhook

Expand
  • Go to your repo's home page
  • Click Settings > Integrations in the sidebar
  • set URL to your ngrok url with /events at the end. Ex. https://c5004d84.ngrok.io/events
  • double-check you added /events to the end of your URL.
  • set Secret Token to your random string
  • check the boxes
    • Push events
    • Comments
    • Merge Request events
  • leave Enable SSL verification checked
  • click Add webhook

Bitbucket Cloud (bitbucket.org) Webhook

Expand
  • Go to your repo's home page
  • Click Settings in the sidebar
  • Click Webhooks under the WORKFLOW section
  • Click Add webhook
  • Enter "Atlantis" for Title
  • Set URL to your ngrok url with /events at the end. Ex. https://c5004d84.ngrok.io/events
  • Double-check you added /events to the end of your URL.
  • Keep Status as Active
  • Don't check Skip certificate validation because NGROK has a valid cert.
  • Select Choose from a full list of triggers
  • Under Repositoryuncheck everything
  • Under Issues leave everything unchecked
  • Under Pull Request, select: Created, Updated, Merged, Declined and Comment created
  • Click SaveBitbucket Webhook

Bitbucket Server (aka Stash) Webhook

Expand
  • Go to your repo's home page
  • Click Settings in the sidebar
  • Click Webhooks under the WORKFLOW section
  • Click Create webhook
  • Enter "Atlantis" for Name
  • Set URL to your ngrok url with /events at the end. Ex. https://c5004d84.ngrok.io/events
  • Double-check you added /events to the end of your URL.
  • Set Secret to your random string
  • Under Repository select Push
  • Under Pull Request, select: Opened, Modified, Merged, Declined, Deleted and Comment added
  • Click SaveBitbucket Webhook

Create an access token for Atlantis

We recommend using a dedicated CI user or creating a new user named @atlantis that performs all API actions, however for testing, you can use your own user. Here we'll create the access token that Atlantis uses to comment on the pull request and set commit statuses.

GitHub or GitHub Enterprise Access Token

TOKEN="{YOUR_TOKEN}"

GitLab or GitLab Enterprise Access Token

TOKEN="{YOUR_TOKEN}"

Bitbucket Cloud (bitbucket.org) Access Token

TOKEN="{YOUR_TOKEN}"

Bitbucket Server (aka Stash) Access Token

  • Click on your avatar in the top right and select Manage account
  • Click Personal access tokens in the sidebar
  • Click Create a token
  • Name the token atlantis
  • Give the token Read Project permissions and Write Pull request permissions
  • Click create and set the token as an environment variable
TOKEN="{YOUR_TOKEN}"

Start Atlantis

You're almost ready to start Atlantis, just set two more variables:

USERNAME="{the username of your GitHub, GitLab or Bitbucket user}"
REPO_WHITELIST="$YOUR_GIT_HOST/$YOUR_USERNAME/$YOUR_REPO"
# ex. REPO_WHITELIST="github.com/runatlantis/atlantis"
# If you're using Bitbucket Server, $YOUR_GIT_HOST will be the domain name of your
# server without scheme or port and $YOUR_USERNAME will be the name of the **project** the repo
# is under, **not the key** of the project.

Now you can start Atlantis. The exact command differs depending on your Git Host:

GitHub Command

atlantis server \
--atlantis-url="$URL" \
--gh-user="$USERNAME" \
--gh-token="$TOKEN" \
--gh-webhook-secret="$SECRET" \
--repo-whitelist="$REPO_WHITELIST"

GitHub Enterprise Command

HOSTNAME=YOUR_GITHUB_ENTERPRISE_HOSTNAME # ex. github.runatlantis.io
atlantis server \
--atlantis-url="$URL" \
--gh-user="$USERNAME" \
--gh-token="$TOKEN" \
--gh-webhook-secret="$SECRET" \
--gh-hostname="$HOSTNAME" \
--repo-whitelist="$REPO_WHITELIST"

GitLab Command

atlantis server \
--atlantis-url="$URL" \
--gitlab-user="$USERNAME" \
--gitlab-token="$TOKEN" \
--gitlab-webhook-secret="$SECRET" \
--repo-whitelist="$REPO_WHITELIST"

GitLab Enterprise Command

HOSTNAME=YOUR_GITLAB_ENTERPRISE_HOSTNAME # ex. gitlab.runatlantis.io
atlantis server \
--atlantis-url="$URL" \
--gitlab-user="$USERNAME" \
--gitlab-token="$TOKEN" \
--gitlab-webhook-secret="$SECRET" \
--gitlab-hostname="$HOSTNAME" \
--repo-whitelist="$REPO_WHITELIST"

Bitbucket Cloud (bitbucket.org) Command

atlantis server \
--atlantis-url="$URL" \
--bitbucket-user="$USERNAME" \
--bitbucket-token="$TOKEN" \
--repo-whitelist="$REPO_WHITELIST"

Bitbucket Server (aka Stash) Command

BASE_URL=YOUR_BITBUCKET_SERVER_URL # ex. http://bitbucket.mycorp:7990
atlantis server \
--atlantis-url="$URL" \
--bitbucket-user="$USERNAME" \
--bitbucket-token="$TOKEN" \
--bitbucket-webhook-secret="$SECRET" \
--bitbucket-base-url="$BASE_URL" \
--repo-whitelist="$REPO_WHITELIST"

Create a pull request

Create a pull request so you can test Atlantis.

TIP

You could add a null resource as a test:

resource "null_resource" "example" {}

Or just modify the whitespace in a file.

Autoplan

You should see Atlantis logging about receiving the webhook and you should see the output of terraform plan on your repo.

Atlantis tries to figure out the directory to plan in based on the files modified. If you need to customize the directories that that Atlantis runs in or the commands it runs if you're using workspaces or .tfvars files, see atlantis.yaml Reference.

Manual Plan

To manually plan in a specific directory or workspace, comment on the pull request using the -d or -w flags:

atlantis plan -d mydir
atlantis plan -w staging

To add additional arguments to the underlying terraform plan you can use:

atlantis plan -- -target=resource -var 'foo=bar'

Apply

If you'd like to apply, type a comment: atlantis apply. You can use the -d or -w flags to point Atlantis at a specific plan. Otherwise it tries to apply the plan for the root directory.

Next Steps

  • If things are working as expected you can Ctrl-C the atlantis server command and the ngrok command.
  • Hopefully Atlantis is working with your repo and you're ready to move on to a production-ready deployment.
  • If it's not working as expected, you may need to customize how Atlantis runs with an atlantis.yaml file. See atlantis.yaml Reference.
  • Check out our full documentation for more details: Documentation.